Maria Augustyn - BLOG
Maria Augustyn - (Naturopath)
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Annual check-ups can uncover some serious risk factors
Autism could be prevented
Multiple Sclerosis Management
Can I eat Bacon and be healthy?
Alzheimer's vaccine

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Drugs to lower cholesterol
Scurvy is back in Australia!
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Low Cholesterol may cause depression
Outbreak of hepatitis: tomatoes blamed

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Maria Augustyn - BLOG

BONES

Children's Language Impairment and Vitamin D

 
 
Maternal vitamin D supplements may help language
 
 
Vitamin D deficiency during early pregnancy is associated with an almost two-fold higher rate of language impairment in the offspring; a study from WA has shown.
 
In a long term follow up study of children born between 1989 and 1991, researchers found that maternal serum vitamin D levels at 18 weeks of pregnancy were related to language difficulties in the children at five and 10 years.
 
However, contrary to other studies, vitamin D insufficiency during pregnancy was not linked to offspring behavioural or emotional  problems at any age, according to the findings published in

Osteoporosis drugs: fractures and jaw rotting disease.

)Drug holiday advised for bisphosphonates
 
Patient using bisphophonates should be considered for a ‘drug holiday’ after five years to minimise the risk of femoral fractures, researchers say. A Canadian study inJAMAshows that older women using bisphosphonates for more than five years have a significant increased risk of subtrochanteric or femoral shaft fractures 
Michael Woodhead
6minutes
 
What are bisphosphonates?
Bisphosphonates are a relatively new family of non-hormonal medications, which have been proven to be effective in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

Menopause: the love deficiency disease.

When menopause is a disease
Menopause has never been a disease that needed to be treated until our 'modern' age. Additionally, primitive cultures of the world don’t even have a word to describe ‘menopause’. They view a woman that is not menstruating any more as a more powerful being, that possesses wisdom and knowledge, someone to be respected and revered.  
 
The medical establishment, generally speaking, considers a menopausal woman as a patient deficient in this or that drug. But, the drug will make you deficient in another drug, and the multiple uses of drugs create other states that are unknown and not even studied yet.

Calcium supplements may cause heart infarction

Calcium supplements
increases risk or heart disease 
Fresh evidence has linked calcium supplements to an increased risk of cardiovascular events, reigniting safety concerns over their use.
 
A meta-analysis published today in theBMJ concludes that calcium supplementation – with or without vitamin D – increases the relative risk of MI (myocardial infarction) and stroke.

The authors said the relative risk increases were modest, at about 25-30% for MI and 15-20% for stroke, but could have a significant impact on a population level.

Vitamin D defficiency...is your baby at risk?

Are you vitamin D defficient?
 
Current guidelines to ensure adequacy of vitamin D levels in pregnancy are failing to prevent serious deficiencies in both mothers and infants, research suggests.
Screening of more than 300 pregnant women at Westmead Hospital in Sydney found moderate to severe vitamin D deficiency in 22% of Australian born women. Severe deficiency was especially common in dark skinned women, affecting 70% of African women, 44% of women from the Indian subcontinent and 22% of women with a Middle-East background.

Fatter oldies...less hip fractures!

Fatter oldies...fewer hip fractures
 
Rates of hip fracture are in decline in Australia, with adiposity rather than anti-fracture drugs being cited as the key factor.
Women have seen a 30% fall in hip fracture rates between 1994 and 2007, while men have seen an 8% decline in hip fracture rates,
Victorian researchers report in theJournal of Bone and Mineral Researchthis week.
However, the studyalso shows that the absolute number of hip fractures is still on the increase, due to the ageing of the population.
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